Filter By:

René Bautista

Principal Research Scientist
Statistics and Methodology
Phone: (312) 357-3867

René Bautista is a principal research scientist in the Statistics and Methodology department at NORC and director of the General Social Survey. His academic training in Survey Methodology and work on sources of measurement error in surveys provides him with a solid theoretical and scientific approach to conduct applied survey research. Bautista has substantial experience developing and implementing major surveys and conducting leading methodological. His research focuses on nonresponse, measurement error, interviewer effects, mixed modes, and data collection methods.

During his tenure at NORC, Bautista has worked on program evaluations including the Census Integrated Communications Program Evaluation in 2010, commissioned by the U.S. Census Bureau, to evaluate the success of the communication campaign implemented prior to the Decennial Census. In particular, the evaluation utilized a mixed survey design (longitudinal and cross-sectional) and aimed to collect information among minority groups. In this project, Bautista advised on strategies to establish statistical significance of key survey estimates. He was responsible for conducting significance testing and multivariate analysis using complex variance estimation techniques. Also, he has participated in other studies commissioned to NORC, such as the evaluation of the Survey of Crime Victimization (SCV) conducted on behalf of the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, where he conducted cognitive interviews and provided guidance on significance testing of experimental data.

Bautista has provided statistical consulting to the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), a project conducted on behalf of the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE). As the first major study of child care and education in the U.S. in over 20 years and largest-ever data collection effort conducted by NORC, Bautista’s work on this project highlights his commitment to generate data of the highest quality and an appreciation of the functions the survey data serve. He continues to contribute to the NSECE team on sampling methodologies for the 2019 NSECE.

Bautista has also provided senior survey methodology advice on questionnaire design and cognitive testing for the 2012 National Survey on Health Information Exchange in Clinical Laboratories, a project commissioned by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. This study evaluates capabilities of laboratories in the U.S. to exchange information using electronic means.

In 2014, Bautista was also a key contributor to the re-design of the National Survey of Children’s Health and the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs by overseeing adaptation of survey instruments (English and Spanish) for the change in data collection strategy from a CATI instrument to a self-administered instrument (paper- and web-based).

In 2015, he was the lead methodologist for one the Task Orders through the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services related to adding new questions to the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS). He led the effort to understand how limited English proficiency (LEP) may impede access to healthcare. This work has meant developing and testing new LEP items and measures that reach well beyond used historically by government agencies.

In 2017, Bautista served as Director for the Worker Voice Study, a survey commissioned by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Sloan School of Management, aiming to collect information among 4,000 workers across the country.

Previously, he worked at the Gallup Research Center at the University of Nebraska. Bautista has also consulted as Election Night Analyst with Edison Media Research –exclusive provider of exit polling data to ABC News, CBS News, CNN, Fox News, NBC News and the Associated Press.

Bautista, who earned his Ph.D. at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, has published scholarly work in peer-reviewed journals and books, and is a frequent presenter in major national and international conferences on survey methodology. He holds an academic appointments as lecturer at the University of Chicago Harris Graduate School of Public Policy and affiliate faculty at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Survey Research and Methodology Program. He currently serves as Associate Editor of Public Opinion Quarterly, the flagship journal of the American Association for Public Opinion Research. He is an elected member of AAPOR’s Executive Council and serves as Associate Chair/Chair-Elect for the AAPOR Standards Committee.

René Bautista

Principal Research Scientist
Statistics and Methodology
(312) 357-3867

René Bautista is a principal research scientist in the Statistics and Methodology department at NORC and director of the General Social Survey. His academic training in Survey Methodology and work on sources of measurement error in surveys provides him with a solid theoretical and scientific approach to conduct applied survey research. Bautista has substantial experience developing and implementing major surveys and conducting leading methodological. His research focuses on nonresponse, measurement error, interviewer effects, mixed modes, and data collection methods.

During his tenure at NORC, Bautista has worked on program evaluations including the Census Integrated Communications Program Evaluation in 2010, commissioned by the U.S. Census Bureau, to evaluate the success of the communication campaign implemented prior to the Decennial Census. In particular, the evaluation utilized a mixed survey design (longitudinal and cross-sectional) and aimed to collect information among minority groups. In this project, Bautista advised on strategies to establish statistical significance of key survey estimates. He was responsible for conducting significance testing and multivariate analysis using complex variance estimation techniques. Also, he has participated in other studies commissioned to NORC, such as the evaluation of the Survey of Crime Victimization (SCV) conducted on behalf of the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, where he conducted cognitive interviews and provided guidance on significance testing of experimental data.

Bautista has provided statistical consulting to the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), a project conducted on behalf of the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE). As the first major study of child care and education in the U.S. in over 20 years and largest-ever data collection effort conducted by NORC, Bautista’s work on this project highlights his commitment to generate data of the highest quality and an appreciation of the functions the survey data serve. He continues to contribute to the NSECE team on sampling methodologies for the 2019 NSECE.

Bautista has also provided senior survey methodology advice on questionnaire design and cognitive testing for the 2012 National Survey on Health Information Exchange in Clinical Laboratories, a project commissioned by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. This study evaluates capabilities of laboratories in the U.S. to exchange information using electronic means.

In 2014, Bautista was also a key contributor to the re-design of the National Survey of Children’s Health and the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs by overseeing adaptation of survey instruments (English and Spanish) for the change in data collection strategy from a CATI instrument to a self-administered instrument (paper- and web-based).

In 2015, he was the lead methodologist for one the Task Orders through the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services related to adding new questions to the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS). He led the effort to understand how limited English proficiency (LEP) may impede access to healthcare. This work has meant developing and testing new LEP items and measures that reach well beyond used historically by government agencies.

In 2017, Bautista served as Director for the Worker Voice Study, a survey commissioned by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Sloan School of Management, aiming to collect information among 4,000 workers across the country.

Previously, he worked at the Gallup Research Center at the University of Nebraska. Bautista has also consulted as Election Night Analyst with Edison Media Research –exclusive provider of exit polling data to ABC News, CBS News, CNN, Fox News, NBC News and the Associated Press.

Bautista, who earned his Ph.D. at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, has published scholarly work in peer-reviewed journals and books, and is a frequent presenter in major national and international conferences on survey methodology. He holds an academic appointments as lecturer at the University of Chicago Harris Graduate School of Public Policy and affiliate faculty at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Survey Research and Methodology Program. He currently serves as Associate Editor of Public Opinion Quarterly, the flagship journal of the American Association for Public Opinion Research. He is an elected member of AAPOR’s Executive Council and serves as Associate Chair/Chair-Elect for the AAPOR Standards Committee.

Bruce G. Taylor

Senior Fellow
Public Health
Phone: (301) 634-9512

Bruce Taylor is a Senior Fellow with NORC at the University of Chicago in the Public Health department. He manages research projects and leads business development in the intersecting areas of violence, health and criminal justice for NORC.

Dr. Taylor has over 20 years of experience in applied research, field experiments, statistical analysis, measurement, survey design, and program evaluation. He has conducted studies on violence prevention, violent offenders, victimization, policing, and illicit drug markets. Most recently his work has focused on identifying demographic and contextual explanations for a variety of forms of violent and related risky behaviors. He has conducted research funded by a number of federal sources, such as the Bureau of Justice Assistance, the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute of Justice, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. His research has also been supported by a number of state and municipal sources, along with several foundations and other private sources (e.g., Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute). Taylor has published his work widely in leading peer-reviewed academic journals such as Addiction Biology, Criminology, Criminology and Public Policy, Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Journal of Adolescent Health, Journal of Experimental Criminology and Journal of Personality and Social Psychology and Prevention Science.

His early work in violence research explored the psychological recovery process of sexual assault victims and explored the correlates of post-crime distress and social networks. In the mid to late 1990s, Dr. Taylor implemented a 5-year program of experimental longitudinal studies in New York City on the effects of a variety of interventions on the problem of intimate partner violence (IPV). This work was followed by randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effectiveness of batterer treatment programs for men in community and jail-based settings. Since 2005, with funding from three US Department of Justice (USDOJ) grants and two contracts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), he has been conducting a series of field experiments on the effectiveness of primary prevention programs on IPV and sexual violence. He is also a Co-Principal Investigator of the first comprehensive nationally representative survey of teen dating violence in the US and the first national survey on victim service providers. In 2012, the Academy of Experimental Criminology (AEC) recognized his RCT work and elected him as an AEC Fellow. He also serves on the USDOJ Violent Crime Victimization Expert Panel.

Prior to joining NORC in 2010, Taylor was the research director for the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF), based in Washington, D.C., from 2005-2010, where he managed a group of about 10 researchers, led strategic and business development for PERF, and developed and managed an annual department budget. From 2002-2005, he was a senior research associate/managing associate at Caliber/ICF International, where he led projects on juvenile justice, children exposed to violence, youth violence prevention, and community policing. From 1998- 2002, he was a researcher and deputy director of the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program, a program within the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Institute of Justice that involved surveys and specimen collection on drugs and crime issues from detained arrestees in more than three dozen cities across the U.S. Prior to his work at DOJ, he was a senior research associate at the Victim Services Agency in New York City, where he conducted basic and applied/evaluation research on crime victim issues.

Bruce G. Taylor

Senior Fellow
Public Health
(301) 634-9512

Bruce Taylor is a Senior Fellow with NORC at the University of Chicago in the Public Health department. He manages research projects and leads business development in the intersecting areas of violence, health and criminal justice for NORC.

Dr. Taylor has over 20 years of experience in applied research, field experiments, statistical analysis, measurement, survey design, and program evaluation. He has conducted studies on violence prevention, violent offenders, victimization, policing, and illicit drug markets. Most recently his work has focused on identifying demographic and contextual explanations for a variety of forms of violent and related risky behaviors. He has conducted research funded by a number of federal sources, such as the Bureau of Justice Assistance, the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute of Justice, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. His research has also been supported by a number of state and municipal sources, along with several foundations and other private sources (e.g., Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute). Taylor has published his work widely in leading peer-reviewed academic journals such as Addiction Biology, Criminology, Criminology and Public Policy, Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Journal of Adolescent Health, Journal of Experimental Criminology and Journal of Personality and Social Psychology and Prevention Science.

His early work in violence research explored the psychological recovery process of sexual assault victims and explored the correlates of post-crime distress and social networks. In the mid to late 1990s, Dr. Taylor implemented a 5-year program of experimental longitudinal studies in New York City on the effects of a variety of interventions on the problem of intimate partner violence (IPV). This work was followed by randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effectiveness of batterer treatment programs for men in community and jail-based settings. Since 2005, with funding from three US Department of Justice (USDOJ) grants and two contracts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), he has been conducting a series of field experiments on the effectiveness of primary prevention programs on IPV and sexual violence. He is also a Co-Principal Investigator of the first comprehensive nationally representative survey of teen dating violence in the US and the first national survey on victim service providers. In 2012, the Academy of Experimental Criminology (AEC) recognized his RCT work and elected him as an AEC Fellow. He also serves on the USDOJ Violent Crime Victimization Expert Panel.

Prior to joining NORC in 2010, Taylor was the research director for the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF), based in Washington, D.C., from 2005-2010, where he managed a group of about 10 researchers, led strategic and business development for PERF, and developed and managed an annual department budget. From 2002-2005, he was a senior research associate/managing associate at Caliber/ICF International, where he led projects on juvenile justice, children exposed to violence, youth violence prevention, and community policing. From 1998- 2002, he was a researcher and deputy director of the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program, a program within the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Institute of Justice that involved surveys and specimen collection on drugs and crime issues from detained arrestees in more than three dozen cities across the U.S. Prior to his work at DOJ, he was a senior research associate at the Victim Services Agency in New York City, where he conducted basic and applied/evaluation research on crime victim issues.

Angela Fontes

Vice President
Economics, Justice, and Society
Phone: (773) 256-6046

Angela Fontes, Ph.D., is vice president in the Economics, Justice, and Society department and director of the Behavioral and Economic Analysis and Decision-making (BEAD) program at NORC at the University of Chicago. At NORC, Fontes oversees research focused on household finance and investor decision-making, with a specific focus on the financial well-being of African American and Hispanic/Latino families. Using both traditional economic methods, as well as methods from behavioral science and marketing, Fontes delivers actionable insights for a diverse set of stakeholders.

A nationally-recognized expert in household finance, Fontes is regularly quoted in national and trade press and is a frequent speaker on topics related to financial wellbeing. She is the Principal Investigator on several projects, including work with the Securities and Exchange Commission to conduct investor protection research, and NORC’s ongoing collaboration with the FINRA Investor Education Foundation. Her research can be found in journals such as the Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, the Journal of the American Medical Association, the Journal of Family and Economic Issues, the Journal of Women, Politics, and Policy, and Financial Counseling and Planning.

Prior to NORC, Fontes worked in business and market research consulting with Chamberlain Research Consultants and Leo Burnett. She is adjunct faculty at Northwestern University where she was recently awarded a Distinguished Graduate Teaching Award. At Northwestern, Fontes teaches graduate courses in behavioral economics and public policy, policy analysis, predictive analytics, and research writing. Fontes is incoming President of the American Council on Consumer Interests, and on the Board of Directors at the Northwest Side Housing Center.

Fontes holds a Ph.D. in Consumer Behavior and Family Economics with a minor in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®).

Angela Fontes

Vice President
Economics, Justice, and Society
(773) 256-6046

Angela Fontes, Ph.D., is vice president in the Economics, Justice, and Society department and director of the Behavioral and Economic Analysis and Decision-making (BEAD) program at NORC at the University of Chicago. At NORC, Fontes oversees research focused on household finance and investor decision-making, with a specific focus on the financial well-being of African American and Hispanic/Latino families. Using both traditional economic methods, as well as methods from behavioral science and marketing, Fontes delivers actionable insights for a diverse set of stakeholders.

A nationally-recognized expert in household finance, Fontes is regularly quoted in national and trade press and is a frequent speaker on topics related to financial wellbeing. She is the Principal Investigator on several projects, including work with the Securities and Exchange Commission to conduct investor protection research, and NORC’s ongoing collaboration with the FINRA Investor Education Foundation. Her research can be found in journals such as the Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, the Journal of the American Medical Association, the Journal of Family and Economic Issues, the Journal of Women, Politics, and Policy, and Financial Counseling and Planning.

Prior to NORC, Fontes worked in business and market research consulting with Chamberlain Research Consultants and Leo Burnett. She is adjunct faculty at Northwestern University where she was recently awarded a Distinguished Graduate Teaching Award. At Northwestern, Fontes teaches graduate courses in behavioral economics and public policy, policy analysis, predictive analytics, and research writing. Fontes is incoming President of the American Council on Consumer Interests, and on the Board of Directors at the Northwest Side Housing Center.

Fontes holds a Ph.D. in Consumer Behavior and Family Economics with a minor in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®).

Tom Rosenstiel

Executive Director
American Press Institute

One of the most recognized thinkers in the country on the future of news, Tom Rosenstiel is the author of 10 books, including three novels. Before joining the American Press Institute in January 2013, he was founder and for 16 years director of the Project for Excellence in Journalism, one of the five original projects of the Pew Research Center in Washington, D.C. He was co-founder and vices chair of the Committee of Concerned Journalists. He is also a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.

His first novel, Shining City (2017), about a supreme court nomination, was an NPR Book of the Year. His second, The Good Lie (2019), about a terrorist incident, was a Washington Post best seller. His third, Oppo, about a presidential campaign, was published in December 2019.

Among his seven books on journalism, politics and ethics is The Elements of Journalism: What News People Should Know and the Public Should Expect, co-authored with Bill Kovach, which has been translated into more than 25 languages and is used widely in journalism education worldwide. It has been called “a modern classic” (NYT) and one of the five best books ever written on journalism (WSJ). Tom’s media criticism, his nonfiction books and his research work at API and at PEJ have generated more than 50,000 academic citations.

During his journalism career he worked as media writer for the Los Angeles Times for a decade, chief congressional correspondent for Newsweek, press critic for MSNBC, business editor of the Peninsula Times Tribune, a reporter for Jack Anderson’s Washington Merry Go ‘Round column, and began his career at the Woodside Country Almanac in his native northern California.

He is the winner of the Goldsmith book Award from Harvard, four Sigma Delta Chi Awards for Journalism Research from SPJ and four awards for national for media criticism from Penn State. He has been named a fellow of the Society of Professional Journalists, the organization’s highest honor, the Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism from the University of Missouri Journalism School, the Dewitt Carter Reddick Award for Outstanding Professional Achievement in the Field of Communications from the University of Texas at Austin, and the Columbia Journalism School Distinguished Alumni Award.

Tom Rosenstiel

Executive Director
American Press Institute

One of the most recognized thinkers in the country on the future of news, Tom Rosenstiel is the author of 10 books, including three novels. Before joining the American Press Institute in January 2013, he was founder and for 16 years director of the Project for Excellence in Journalism, one of the five original projects of the Pew Research Center in Washington, D.C. He was co-founder and vices chair of the Committee of Concerned Journalists. He is also a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.

His first novel, Shining City (2017), about a supreme court nomination, was an NPR Book of the Year. His second, The Good Lie (2019), about a terrorist incident, was a Washington Post best seller. His third, Oppo, about a presidential campaign, was published in December 2019.

Among his seven books on journalism, politics and ethics is The Elements of Journalism: What News People Should Know and the Public Should Expect, co-authored with Bill Kovach, which has been translated into more than 25 languages and is used widely in journalism education worldwide. It has been called “a modern classic” (NYT) and one of the five best books ever written on journalism (WSJ). Tom’s media criticism, his nonfiction books and his research work at API and at PEJ have generated more than 50,000 academic citations.

During his journalism career he worked as media writer for the Los Angeles Times for a decade, chief congressional correspondent for Newsweek, press critic for MSNBC, business editor of the Peninsula Times Tribune, a reporter for Jack Anderson’s Washington Merry Go ‘Round column, and began his career at the Woodside Country Almanac in his native northern California.

He is the winner of the Goldsmith book Award from Harvard, four Sigma Delta Chi Awards for Journalism Research from SPJ and four awards for national for media criticism from Penn State. He has been named a fellow of the Society of Professional Journalists, the organization’s highest honor, the Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism from the University of Missouri Journalism School, the Dewitt Carter Reddick Award for Outstanding Professional Achievement in the Field of Communications from the University of Texas at Austin, and the Columbia Journalism School Distinguished Alumni Award.

Jeff Sonderman

Deputy Executive Director and Executive Vice President
American Press Institute

Jeff Sonderman is the deputy executive director of the American Press Institute, helping to lead its use of research, tools, events, and strategic insights to advance and sustain journalism.

He is a leader in helping modern journalism thrive through the right blend of technology, audience engagement, data-driven content strategy, integrated business models, and transformative leadership. He has worked as a writer, editor, manager, coach, trainer, speaker, and consultant with diverse types of news publishers across the country.

He is the architect and developer of API’s Metrics for News analytics software that reinvents how publishers use data to inform content strategy. He also edits API’s Need to Know newsletter, a uniquely designed resource for spreading fresh, useful insights across the industry, and designed API’s Strategy Studies research format for in-depth strategic guidance. And he consults with publishers on a range of issues related to content strategy, organizational transformation, audience development, newsroom structure and workflows, product management, and much more.

He has taught digital journalism at Georgetown University. Before joining the American Press Institute in 2013, he was the digital media fellow of The Poynter Institute. His earlier journalism background includes digital news — helping to launch TBD.com, a local digital news startup in Washington, D.C. — and various roles in newspapers, as an award-winning reporter, online editor and metro editor of The Times-Tribune in Scranton, Pa.

He graduated from the Missouri School of Journalism and resides in Falls Church, Va., with his wife and daughter.

Jeff Sonderman

Deputy Executive Director and Executive Vice President
American Press Institute

Jeff Sonderman is the deputy executive director of the American Press Institute, helping to lead its use of research, tools, events, and strategic insights to advance and sustain journalism.

He is a leader in helping modern journalism thrive through the right blend of technology, audience engagement, data-driven content strategy, integrated business models, and transformative leadership. He has worked as a writer, editor, manager, coach, trainer, speaker, and consultant with diverse types of news publishers across the country.

He is the architect and developer of API’s Metrics for News analytics software that reinvents how publishers use data to inform content strategy. He also edits API’s Need to Know newsletter, a uniquely designed resource for spreading fresh, useful insights across the industry, and designed API’s Strategy Studies research format for in-depth strategic guidance. And he consults with publishers on a range of issues related to content strategy, organizational transformation, audience development, newsroom structure and workflows, product management, and much more.

He has taught digital journalism at Georgetown University. Before joining the American Press Institute in 2013, he was the digital media fellow of The Poynter Institute. His earlier journalism background includes digital news — helping to launch TBD.com, a local digital news startup in Washington, D.C. — and various roles in newspapers, as an award-winning reporter, online editor and metro editor of The Times-Tribune in Scranton, Pa.

He graduated from the Missouri School of Journalism and resides in Falls Church, Va., with his wife and daughter.