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4/25/2018 Poll: Younger Americans less apt to use unique passwords
The number of online accounts compromised by hackers is now in the trillions — enough, perhaps, to make even technophobes think hard about the security of their passwords. Indeed, many are — especially older Americans, a new survey shows.

Start with the now-familiar advice to avoid reusing the same password across important accounts such as email, banking and social media. A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that 41 percent of Americans say they use unique passwords for most or all online services. Just a third of adults under age 45 do so, however, compared to about half their elders.
4/24/2018 AP-NORC poll: Privacy debacle prompts social-media changes
NEW YORK (AP) — If you’ve made changes to how you use social media since Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica privacy debacle, you’re not alone.

A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that 7 out of 10 of online adults who’ve heard of the scandal — revelations that a data mining firm may have accessed the private information of some 87 million Facebook users to influence elections — have unfollowed accounts, deleted their profiles or made other changes in how they use social media.
4/23/2018 AP-NORC Poll: Amid strikes, Americans back teacher raises
WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans overwhelmingly believe teachers don’t make enough money, and half say they’d support paying higher taxes to give educators a raise.

The findings of the new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research come amid recent teacher strikes and other protests over low pay, tough classroom conditions and the amount of money allocated to public schools in several Republican-led states.
4/20/2018 AP-NORC Poll: Americans expect Russia tension will get worse
WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans largely fear the country’s relationship with Russia and China will get worse in the coming year, and despite signs of diplomatic progress with Kim Jong Un on nuclear weapons, nearly half say the same about North Korea.

That’s according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research that provides insight into the public’s view on the direction of U.S. ties with those key strategic rivals, 15 months after President Donald Trump took office.
4/5/2018 AP-NORC Poll: Most Americans see drug addiction as a disease
WASHINGTON (AP) — A slim majority of Americans see prescription drug addiction as a disease that requires medical treatment, but most would not welcome those suffering from the problem into their neighborhoods, workplaces or families.

New survey results reveal Americans’ complex view of addiction as the deadliest drug epidemic in U.S. history ripples through communities nationwide. More than 1 in 10 Americans say they have had a relative or close friend die from an opioid overdose, according a recent survey by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
3/30/2018 New survey takes pulse of young Americans
As the run-up to the U.S. midterm elections begins, the new Youth Political Pulse survey, by MTV with The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, aims to reveal what political issues matter most to young Americans.

The survey of teens and young adults provides valuable insight into the next generation of potential voters as the midterms approach. Teens as young as 15, who will be eligible to vote in the 2020 presidential election, are surveyed, as well as young people up to age 34.
3/30/2018 AP-NORC Poll: 50 years after MLK, civil rights goals unmet
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., only 1 in 10 African Americans think the United States has achieved all or most of the goals of the civil rights movement he led, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

Three-quarters of African Americans said there has been little or no progress on fair treatment by police, and more than half answered the same about fair coverage by the media, political representation or equal economic opportunities.
3/30/2018 AP-NORC/MTV Poll: Young people run from Trump
NEW YORK (AP) — A majority of young people believe President Donald Trump is racist, dishonest and “mentally unfit” for office, according to a new survey that finds the nation’s youngest potential voters are more concerned about the Republican’s performance in the White House than older Americans.

The poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and MTV found that just 33 percent of Americans between the ages of 15 and 34 approve of Trump’s job performance.
3/27/2018 AP-NORC Poll: Trump’s approval rating up from historic lows
WASHINGTON (AP) — The good news for President Donald Trump? His approval rating is up 7 points since last month, according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

The bad news? That only lifts Trump’s approval to 42 percent, low for a president at this point in his tenure.
3/26/2018 AP-NORC Poll: Americans open to Trump’s planned NKorea talks
WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans appear open to President Donald Trump’s surprise decision to negotiate directly with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, and at the same time are less concerned than in recent months by the threat posed by the pariah nation’s nuclear weapons.

That’s according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, taken after Trump agreed to what would be unprecedented meeting between a U.S. and a North Korean leader.
3/23/2018 AP-NORC Poll: Support soars for stricter gun control laws
NEW YORK (AP) — Support for tougher gun control laws is soaring in the United States, according to a new poll that found a majority of gun owners and half of Republicans favor new laws to address gun violence in the weeks after a Florida school shooting left 17 dead and sparked nationwide protests.

The poll, conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, found that nearly 7 in 10 adults now favor stricter gun control measures. That’s the strongest level of support since The Associated Press first asked the question five years ago. The new poll also found that nearly half of Americans do not expect elected officials to take action.
2/28/2018 AP-NORC Poll: Most Americans say Trump is racist
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than half of Americans, including large majorities of blacks and Hispanics, think President Donald Trump is a racist. More than half think his policies have made things worse for Hispanics and Muslims, and nearly half say they’ve made things worse for African Americans.

According to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, 57 percent of Americans think Trump’s policies have been bad for Muslims, and 56 percent think they’ve been bad for Hispanics. Forty-seven percent, including three-quarters of blacks, think they’ve been bad for African Americans.
2/27/2018 Survey offers revealing look at news subscribers
A new study by the Media Insight Project, a joint effort by the American Press Institute and The AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, reveals what motivates readers to pay for news, offering publishers insight into the new media landscape.

It also identifies key differences between print and digital subscribers. Namely, the latter tend to be younger, male and more educated than print readers, and are more often attracted by good coverage of a particular topic and by especially useful or interesting content.
2/26/2018 Americans say Congress is listening to all the wrong people
WASHINGTON (AP) — Looking for common ground with your neighbor these days? Try switching subjects from the weather to Congress. Chances are, you both agree it’s terrible.

In red, blue or purple states, in middle America or on the coasts, most Americans loathe the nation’s legislature. One big reason: Most think lawmakers are listening to all the wrong people, suggests a new study by researchers at Stanford University and the University of California-Santa Barbara with the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
2/23/2018 AP-NORC Poll: People feel better about economy, not country
WASHINGTON (AP) — Chester Trahan’s grandchildren are working, so he’s feeling better about the economy these days. But his view of the country’s overall direction is pretty grim, darkened by what he sees as a surge in racism and violence fueled by President Donald Trump.

“He stimulated it. Those people were always there, but he gave them a voice,” said Trahan, a 78-year-old retiree from Palm Coast, Florida. He’s not about to give Trump credit even for the good stuff. “I don’t think he’s really done anything to help the economy out. It’s been doing pretty well for awhile.”

Trahan’s conflicted outlook of America under Trump — the economy is headed in a better direction than the country overall — is widely shared. A majority in a new poll, 52 percent, say they think the country’s direction has worsened over the last year, and only 28 percent are optimistic that things will get better in the year to come.
2/14/2018 AP-WE tv poll: Weddings cost cash but most say they’re fun
#Weddingstressmuch?

Social media is creeping into U.S. nuptials, but Americans don’t necessarily see that as a good thing.

A new Associated Press-WE tv poll says 57 percent of them see social media as having increased the stress involved in planning a wedding, while just 12 percent think the opposite. The poll was conducted by the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
1/19/2018 President Trump steps to forefront of anti-abortion movement
WASHINGTON (AP) — He once called himself “pro-choice.” But a year into his presidency, Donald Trump is stepping to the forefront of his administration’s efforts to roll back abortion rights.

“Love saves lives,” the president said Friday from the White House Rose Garden, in an address broadcast to thousands of demonstrators in the annual March for Life. “We are with you all the way.”

Though his record is mixed and a midterm election looms, abortion opponents say they have not felt so optimistic in at least a decade.
1/16/2018 Trump ends 1st year with lowest average approval rating
WASHINGTON (AP) — This is a record not to be coveted: Donald Trump is wrapping up a year in office with the lowest average approval rating of any elected president in his first year.

That’s according to polling by Gallup, which shows that Trump has averaged just a 39 percent approval rating since his inauguration. The previous low was held by Bill Clinton, whose first-year average stood 10 points higher than Trump’s, at 49 percent.

Recent surveys show most Americans view Trump as a divisive figure and even question his fitness for office. One relative bright spot for Trump is his handling of the economy, though even there his ratings are not as high as might be expected given a relatively strong economy.
12/22/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Most say GOP too lenient on sexual misconduct
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans think the Republican Party has been too lenient when it comes to reports of sexual misconduct, but they’re split on how well the Democrats are handling the allegations, a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research shows.

The poll shows 60 percent of Americans think Republicans are too lenient on politicians from their own party who are accused of sexual misconduct. Another 31 percent think their reaction is about right and 7 percent think they’re too hard on them.

12/22/2017 Poll: Most say sex misconduct victims are underprotected
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans say sexual misconduct is a major problem and that too little is being done to protect victims, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. But some — particularly Republican men — are concerned about the rights of the accused.

The sheer speed with which an accusation of sexual misconduct can sink a career rattles some men, and not just Republicans. Bart Cassida, a 40-year-old Democrat from Indiana, said he tends to believe the accusers. But he’s concerned about employers “immediately dismissing people without proper investigation.”
12/21/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Health care is the issue that won’t go away
WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Donald Trump completes his first year in office, Americans are increasingly concerned about health care, and their faith that government can fix it has fallen.

A new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that 48 percent named health care as a top problem for the government to focus on in the next year, up 17 points in the last two years.
12/16/2017 Americans pessimistic about Trump, country: AP-NORC Poll

​WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump frequently casts his first year in office as a string of successes and campaign promises fulfilled. But less than a quarter of Americans think Trump has made good on the pledges he made to voters while running for president, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

12/15/2017 Senate may put off most anticipated Russian probe findings
WASHINGTON (AP) — With no firm conclusions yet on whether President Donald Trump’s campaign may have coordinated with Russia, the Senate intelligence committee could delay answering that question and issue more bipartisan recommendations early next year on protecting future elections from foreign tampering.

Recommendations on how to counter the threat from attempted election hackers could be the first written product from congressional committees examining Russian interference into the 2016 election that put Trump in the White House. An early bipartisan report could be an attempt to boost confidence in the panel’s probe, as lawmakers worry that other issues could be lost if they are not able to agree on the most anticipated questions like collusion.
12/15/2017 Poll: Most believe Trump trying to obstruct Russia probe
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans think Donald Trump did something illegal or at least unethical regarding ties between his presidential campaign and Russia — and they think he’s trying to obstruct the investigation looking into those possible connections.

The deeply divided country is more concerned about health care and the economy than any collusion with the Kremlin, according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. But the survey also shows that Americans are unhappy with the way Trump is dealing with the investigations led by Congress and special counsel Robert Mueller.
11/15/2017 Retirement planning should include long-term care costs
NEW YORK (AP) — Many Americans have a blind spot when it comes to retirement planning: long-term care costs. Even though the majority of Americans will at some point need long-term care, few are planning for it. Many underestimate the costs and mistakenly believe health insurance can help cover it.

“This is not like being struck by lightning. It is something we will all face in our lives,” said Bruce Chernof, president and CEO of the SCAN Foundation, which researches care for older adults. “If we don’t need it ourselves, it is likely that our spouses, our significant other or our parents will. One way or another, it will touch the lives of every single American.”
11/15/2017 Poll: 1 in 3 Americans dreads political talk at Thanksgiving
WASHINGTON (AP) — Pass the turkey — but maybe hold the politics. The already-fraught topic now includes allegations of sexual misconduct against politicians of various political stripes.

From GOP President Donald Trump to Democratic Sen. Al Franken, politicians past, present and aspiring stand accused of sexual misconduct and that could keep tensions high at the holiday table. More than a third of Americans dread the prospect of politics coming up over Thanksgiving, a new poll shows.
11/2/2017 AP-CNBC Poll: Interview questions often run afoul of the law

​It’s tough to come up with the right answer in a job interview, particularly if the question could run afoul of the law.

An Associated Press-CNBC poll found that half of all Americans who’ve ever applied for a job have been asked questions that could be used to discriminate against a protected class under equal opportunity law.

10/29/2017 AP-NORC poll: Most have little fear of robots taking jobs
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans believe their jobs, and the jobs of those they live with, are safe from automation — at least for the next decade, according to an Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll.

And more than half think automation could make their work easier or more efficient in the future.

The findings suggest that while Americans express concern about how automation technology might cause some other people to lose jobs, they are less worried about its effect on themselves.
10/25/2017 In poll, people say Trump tax plan benefits rich, companies

​​WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans say President Donald Trump’s tax plan would benefit the wealthy and corporations, and less than half believe his message that “massive tax cuts” would help middle-class workers, according to an Associated Press-NORC poll.

10/20/2017 Vegas shooting doesn’t change opinions on guns: AP-NORC poll

​​ATLANTA (AP) — The slaying of five dozen people in Las Vegas did little to change Americans’ opinions about gun laws.

The nation is closely divided on whether restricting firearms would reduce such mass shootings or homicides, though a majority favor tighter laws as they have for several years, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

10/12/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Americans blame wild weather on global warming
WASHINGTON (AP) — After hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria blitzed the nation, most Americans think weather disasters are getting more severe and see global warming’s fingerprints.

A new poll from the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that 68 percent of Americans think weather disasters seem to be worsening, compared to 28 percent who think they are staying the same and only 4 percent who say they are less severe.
10/11/2017 AP-NORC Poll: North Korea nuke advances spook most Americans
WASHINGTON (AP) — North Korea’s nuclear weapons development is spooking most Americans, and two-thirds of them say President Donald Trump’s war of words with the isolated nation’s leader is making the situation worse. Less than 1 in 10 thinks Trump’s comments are making it better.

Those are the findings of a poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, as tensions between the adversaries escalate and North Korea comes closer to its goal of having a nuclear-tipped missile that could strike the continental U.S.
10/10/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Most don’t want young immigrants deported
WASHINGTON (AP) — Just 1 in 5 Americans want to deport young immigrants brought to the United States as children and now here illegally, the focus of a politically fraught debate between the White House and Congress.

Americans also have largely negative opinions about President Donald Trump’s signature immigration pledge to build a wall along the entire U.S.-Mexico border, according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Just under half — 49 percent — oppose construction, while 32 percent support it.
10/7/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Just 24 percent say US heading right direction
WASHINGTON (AP) — Just 24 percent of Americans believe the country is heading in the right direction after a tumultuous stretch for President Donald Trump that included the threat of war with North Korea, stormy complaints about hurricane relief and Trump’s equivocating about white supremacists. That’s a 10-point drop since June, according to a poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
10/6/2017 ​AP-NORC Poll Disapproval for anthem protest, Trump response
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans think refusing to stand for the national anthem is disrespectful to the country, the military and the American flag. But most also disapprove of President Donald Trump’s calling for NFL players to be fired for refusing to stand.

The NFL protests began last season with quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who knelt during the national anthem to bring more attention to the killings of black men by police officers. The protests spread this season after the former San Francisco 49er was unable to sign on with another team. Seattle Seahawks defensive end Michael Bennett recently said he was racially profiled by Las Vegas police and then Trump sounded off.

According to a poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, 52 percent of Americans disapprove of professional athletes who have protested by refusing to stand during the national anthem, compared to 31 percent who approve. At the same time, 55 percent of Americans disapprove of Trump’s call for firing players who refuse to stand, while 31 percent approve.
10/5/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Adult caregivers overwhelmed and undertrained
WASHINGTON (AP) — Adult caregivers looking after aging relatives and friends have little training for their stressful roles but still find the experience rewarding, according to a poll released Thursday.

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey finds that long-term caregivers don’t just provide rides to the doctor and run errands. Nearly half perform some kind of medical care, from changing bandages (30 percent) to inserting catheters or feeding tubes (6 percent).
10/4/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Low marks for Trump’s Puerto Rico response
WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans are more likely to disapprove than approve of President Donald Trump’s handling of the Puerto Rico hurricane relief effort.
According to a poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, just 32 percent approve of how Trump is handling disaster relief in the U.S. territory, while 49 percent disapprove.
10/2/2017 AP-NORC poll: Americans want local leaders to fight warming

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans want their local officials to take on the challenge of battling global warming now that President Donald Trump is withdrawing the nation an international climate change agreement.

That’s according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago. The poll finds 57 percent of Americans say they favor local governments picking up the slack to try and reduce greenhouse gas emissions on their own, with only 10 percent opposing it. About 55 percent of Americans say their own local and state governments should be doing more to address global warming, with only 10 percent saying they should be doing less.

8/21/2017 AP-NORC poll: Hispanics lack confidence in nursing homes
WASHINGTON (AP) — Hispanics in the United States have a longer life expectancy, but a poll finds few older Latinos are confident that nursing homes and assisted living facilities can meet their needs.

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey also showed that close to one-half of older Hispanics have faced language or cultural barriers interacting with health care providers.
8/2/2017 Workplace accident death rate higher for older workers
Older people are dying on the job at a higher rate than workers overall, even as the rate of workplace fatalities decreases, according to an Associated Press analysis of federal statistics.

It’s a trend that’s particularly alarming as baby boomers reject the traditional retirement age of 65 and keep working. The U.S. government estimates that by 2024, older workers will account for 25 percent of the labor market.
8/2/2017 Companies taking steps to keep older workers safe on the job
When managers at Bon Secours Virginia Health System started analyzing workers’ compensation cases, they noticed a bad combination: Older nurses were having problems from lifting heavy and sicker patients.

“We saw an increase in back injuries and older workers were more likely to suffer from those injuries,” said Jim Godwin, vice president of human resources. “Not only that, but we thought if we can keep workers from sustaining (back) injuries when they are younger, they can continue working longer.”
7/20/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Shift to political left seen on health care
WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans were never too thrilled with “Obamacare” and they definitely disapprove of Republican alternatives in Congress, so what does the public want to do on health care?

A new poll suggests the country may be shifting left on this core issue, with 62 percent saying it’s the federal government’s responsibility to make sure that all Americans have health care coverage, while 37 percent say it is not.

The survey findings from the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research indicate a change in public attitudes over the past few months, as concerns mounted about GOP legislation estimated to leave tens of millions without coverage.
7/19/2017 AP-NORC poll: Negotiate on ‘Obamacare,’ don’t just kill it
WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans overwhelmingly want lawmakers of both parties to work out health care changes, with only 13 percent supporting Republican moves to repeal “Obamacare” absent a replacement, according to a new poll.

Although a deep partisan divide endures over the 2010 Affordable Care Act, people may be less far apart on what policymakers should try next, says the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey.
7/12/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Three-quarters in US say they lack influence
WASHINGTON (AP) — Linda Bell, a beekeeper and farmer who makes about $11,000 a year, feels Washington power brokers have no intention of making health care affordable.

“They don’t care about people like me,” says the Bosque County, Texas, resident.

Three-quarters of Americans agree that people like themselves have too little influence in Washington, rare unanimity across political, economic, racial and geographical lines and including both those who approve and disapprove of President Donald Trump, according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Majorities also don’t have a great deal of confidence in most of the nation’s institutions. That’s especially true of Congress, which takes the biggest hit, and the presidency.
6/22/2017 Summer vacation: Never mind the hike. Where’s the hammock?
Never mind the hike. Where’s the hammock?

A new poll about summer travel finds that the No. 1 thing Americans want to do on vacation is ... nothing.

Almost three-fourths of Americans say resting and relaxing is very or extremely important to them when they go on vacation, according to the survey from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
6/20/2017 AP-NORC poll: Few favor Trump move to ditch Paris accord
WASHINGTON (AP) — Less than one-third of Americans support President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accord, a new poll shows, and just 18 percent of respondents agree with his claim that pulling out of the international agreement to reduce carbon emissions will help the U.S. economy.

The survey conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research earlier this month found that a slim majority — 52 percent — worry that withdrawing will actually hurt the economy. Twenty-seven percent think it won’t have an impact either way.
6/20/2017 Poll: Courts are right in blocking Trump’s travel ban
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans say federal courts are acting properly in blocking President Donald Trump’s travel ban, according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

Two versions of the travel ban targeting Muslim-majority countries have been put on hold by federal courts. Trump says the ban is necessary to keep would-be terrorists from traveling to the United States. Opponents, including some state officials, argue that it is intended to keep Muslims out.
6/15/2017 AP-NORC poll: Just 1 in 5 support Trump’s move to fire Comey
WASHINGTON (AP) — A clear majority of Americans believe President Donald Trump has tried to interfere with the investigation into whether Russia meddled in the 2016 election and possible Trump campaign collusion, a new poll released Thursday shows. Just one in five support his decision to oust James Comey from the FBI.

Following Comey’s blockbuster appearance before Congress, an Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll shows 68 percent of Americans are at least moderately concerned about the possibility that Trump or his campaign associates had inappropriate ties to Russia. Almost half of Americans say they’re very concerned. Only 3 in 10 say they’re not that concerned.
6/15/2017 Summer vacation? Lots of Americans say they can’t afford it
Forget frequent flier miles, last-minute getaways and even road trips. Nearly half of Americans say they won’t be taking a vacation this summer, mostly because they can’t afford it, according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

The new AP-NORC survey, conducted in May, said 43 percent of Americans won’t be taking a summer vacation. The top reason for skipping a trip was the cost, cited by 49 percent of non-vacationers. Another 11 percent said they can’t take the time off from work, while 3 percent said they don’t like to be away from work.
6/14/2017 Poll shows most doubt Trump’s respect for institutions
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans say they think President Donald Trump has little to no respect for the country’s democratic traditions, according to a new poll that underscores the difficulty Trump faces in uniting a country deeply divided about his leadership.

The new survey, conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, found more than 6 in 10 Americans disapprove of the job Trump is doing as president, and nearly half strongly disapprove. The poll was conducted before a shooting spree at a Washington-era baseball field on Wednesday left a congressman wounded and renewed calls for more civil political discourse.
6/14/2017 Experts: Uphill fight against age-related job discrimination
WASHINGTON (AP) — Age-related discrimination in the workplace still exists 50 years after the enactment of legislation designed to prevent it, aging experts and advocates told the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on Wednesday.

Laurie McCann, senior attorney for the AARP Foundation Litigation, said the law “should not be treated as a second-class civil rights statute providing older workers far less protection than other civil rights laws.”
5/25/2017 Poll: Older Americans want Medicare-covered long-term care
WASHINGTON (AP) — A growing number of Americans age 40 and older think Medicare should cover the costs of long-term care for older adults, according to a poll conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

That option is unlikely to gain much traction as President Donald Trump’s administration and Republicans in Congress look to cut the federal budget and repeal President Barack Obama’s 2010 health care law. Most older Americans mistakenly believe they can rely on Medicare already, the poll shows, while few have done much planning for their own long-term care.
5/24/2017 Americans don’t trust media, but feel better about favorites
NEW YORK (AP) — While Americans have doubts about how much they should trust the “news media” in general, a poll by the Media Insight Project released Wednesday suggests they have a higher opinion of the sources they personally rely upon to follow the world.

The survey by the project, a partnership between The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and American Press Institute, echoed the phenomenon where people express distaste for politicians yet support their local representatives.
5/24/2017 ​A third of older Latinos have tapped into retirement savings
CHICAGO (AP) — Suddenly jobless and with small children to support, Jose Victor Camargo without hesitation cashed out a retirement account he had with his former employer.

That was more than a decade ago, and the father of three used the money to pay for rent and stay afloat until he found another job. “We are always in need, so I used the money,” he said in Spanish. “We were struggling. We tried to make the money stretch.”

An Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll found that older Latinos are more likely than older whites or older blacks to say they’ve had to withdraw or borrow money from a retirement account — 34 percent for Latinos compared with 24 percent for whites and 25 percent for blacks.
5/18/2017 ​Poll says blacks less likely to have enough for retirement
CHICAGO (AP) — Older white Americans are nearly twice as likely as African-Americans to say they’ve saved enough for retirement, a new poll found.

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey also found that African- Americans and Latinos have less financial security than whites and will rely on fewer sources of income during retirement. The retirement savings gap between white and other minority groups extends beyond pensions, 401(k)s or other retirement accounts.
5/12/2017 AP-NORC poll: Most Americans feel fine about school choice
WASHINGTON (AP) — Even as fierce political battles rage in Washington over school choice, most Americans know little about charter schools or private school voucher programs. Still, more Americans feel positively than negatively about expanding those programs, according to a new poll released Friday.

“I wonder what the fuss is about,” said Beverly Brown, 61, a retired grocery store worker in central Alabama. Brown, who doesn’t have children, says American schools need reform, but she is not familiar with specific school options and policies. “Educational standards have to be improved overall.”

All told, 58 percent of respondents say they know little or nothing at all about charter schools and 66 percent report the same about private school voucher programs, according to the poll conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
5/5/2017 Poll: Older ex-cons have fewer sources of retirement income
CHICAGO (AP) — While many Americans his age are planning for retirement, Joseph Rodriguez is looking for his first permanent job.

Rodriguez, a 51-year-old Chicago resident, spent 35 years in prison for fatally shooting two people. “I don’t have the luxury to even think about that (retirement) since I’m having a late start in my life,” he says. “I’m going to have to constantly work until my last breath.”

A new survey by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that 69 percent of older Americans who reported having been incarcerated felt anxious about the amount of money they have saved for retirement, compared with 52 percent of those who didn’t serve time.
5/2/2017 Pay for news? More than half of Americans say they do
NEW YORK (AP) — A battered news industry can find some flickers of hope in a survey that gauges public willingness to pay for journalism, as long as its leaders plan judiciously.

A little more than half of American adults regularly pay for news, through newspaper and magazine subscriptions, apps on electronic devices or contributions to public media, according to the Media Insight Project, a collaboration between the American Press Institute and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
4/27/2017 AP-NORC poll: Most teens have taken social media break
NEW YORK (AP) — The common stereotype has teens glued to their phones 24-7. But nearly 60 percent of teens in the U.S. have actually taken a break from social media — the bulk of them voluntarily, a new survey found.

The poll, from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, surveyed teens aged 13 to 17 and found that most value the feeling of connection with friends and family that social media provides. A much smaller number associate it with negative emotions, such as being overwhelmed or needing to always show their best selves.
4/20/2017 ​AP-NORC Poll: Black teens most active on social media apps
Teenagers and their technology are inseparable, but a new poll shows black teens are the most likely to have access to smartphones — which could explain why they're the biggest and most frequent users of mobile-friendly social media apps Snapchat and Instagram.

A survey released Thursday by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research explored teens' social media use and its relationship to race and class. The poll found that nearly 9 in 10 black teenagers use Snapchat, compared with just over 7 in 10 whites. And 4 in 10 black teens report using Snapchat almost constantly, compared with about 2 in 10 white teens.
4/6/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Most Americans oppose funding border wall
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans oppose funding President Donald Trump's wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and even many of his supporters reject his proposed budget cuts to scientific and medical research, according to poll released Thursday by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

The president gets higher marks for efforts to boost defense spending and beef up the border patrol, the poll found.
4/4/2017 Poll: Most young people say gov't should pay for health care
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most young Americans want any health care overhaul under President Donald Trump to look a lot like the Affordable Care Act signed into law by his predecessor, President Barack Obama.

But there's one big exception: A majority of young Americans dislike "Obamacare's" requirement that all Americans buy insurance or pay a fine.

A GenForward poll says a majority of people ages 18 to 30 think the federal government should be responsible for making sure Americans have health insurance. It suggests most young Americans won't be content with a law offering "access" to coverage, as Trump and Republicans in Congress proposed in doomed legislation they dropped March 24. The Trump administration is talking this week of somehow reviving the legislation.​
4/1/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Most Americans want independent Russia probe
NEW YORK (AP) — A slim majority of Americans favor an independent investigation into the Trump campaign's ties with the Russian government, according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research that showed public views about the controversy driving congressional investigations are sharply divided along party lines.

Amid questions swirling in Washington that have forced the resignation of one top Trump official and the scrutiny of several others, most Americans say they're at least somewhat concerned about the possibility that the Republican businessman's campaign had inappropriate contacts with the Russian government, but less than half say they're very concerned.
3/30/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Most disapprove of Trump, except on economy
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans disapprove of Donald Trump's overall performance two months into his presidency. But they're more upbeat about at least one critical area: his handling of the economy.

Nearly 6 in 10 Americans disapprove of Trump's overall performance, and about the same percentage say the country is headed in the wrong direction, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. It was conducted amid the collapse of the GOP's health care overhaul.
3/30/2017 Poll: Americans dislike GOP's, Trump's plan on health care
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Note to President Donald Trump and House Republicans: People really don't like your approach to overhauling America's health care. If you're hoping to revive the effort, you may want to try something different.

Sixty-two percent of Americans turned thumbs down on Trump's handling of health care during the initial weeks of his presidency, according to a poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research released Wednesday. It was his worst rating among seven issues the poll tested, including the economy, foreign policy and immigration.
3/20/2017 ​​​Sharers rather than authors more important on social media
​NEW YORK (AP) — The person who shares a news story on social media is more important than the story's actual source in determining whether readers believe it, a study by the Media Insight Project has found.

In a previous study, consumers said they paid greater heed to where the story originated. But the Media Insight Project, a collaboration between The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the American Press Institute, set up an experiment that found something different.
3/18/2017 Young Americans: Most see Trump as illegitimate president
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Jermaine Anderson keeps going back to the same memory of Donald Trump, then a candidate for president of the United States, referring to some Mexican immigrants as rapists and murderers.

"You can't be saying that (if) you're the president," says Anderson, a 21-year-old student from Coconut Creek, Florida.

That Trump is undeniably the nation's 45th president doesn't sit easily with young Americans like Anderson who are the nation's increasingly diverse electorate of the future, according to a new poll. A majority of young adults — 57 percent — see Trump's presidency as illegitimate, including about three-quarters of blacks and large majorities of Latinos and Asians, the GenForward poll found.
3/6/2017 Poll: Americans divided on admitting refugees
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Where immigrants are concerned, James Wright is OK with people who are here legally, as well as illegally — if they haven't committed crimes. But turn the talk specifically to the risks and benefits of admitting refugees to the U.S., and the New Jersey resident gives a fraught sigh.

"It's hard not to be conflicted," said Wright, 26, an independent who supports President Donald Trump's proposed travel ban on certain foreigners. "By no means do I want to be cruel and keep people out who need a safe place. But we have to have a better system of thoroughly finding out who they are."

Wright is part of a group of Americans a new survey suggests are making distinctions between legal immigrants who choose to be here and refugees — who are legal immigrants, too — fleeing persecution in their home countries. A new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research reflects that divide, with two-thirds of the respondents saying the benefits of legal immigration generally outweigh the risks. But just over half — 52 percent — say refugees pose a great enough risk to further limit their entry into the United States.
3/5/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Divided Americans fret country losing identity
​NEW YORK (AP) — Add one more to the list of things dividing left and right in this country: We can't even agree what it means to be an American.

A new survey from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds Republicans are far more likely to cite a culture grounded in Christian beliefs and the traditions of early European immigrants as essential to U.S. identity.
2/27/2017 AP-NORC Poll: US teens disillusioned, divided by politics
​PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — In the days after President Donald Trump's election, thousands of teenagers across the nation walked out of class in protest. Others rallied to his defense.

It was an unusual show of political engagement from future voters who may alter America's political landscape in 2020 — or even in next year's midterm elections.

Now, a new survey of children ages 13 to 17 conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research with the permission of their parents finds that America's teens are almost as politically disillusioned and pessimistic about the nation's divisions as their parents. The difference? They aren't quite as quick to write off the future.
2/14/2017 ​​​​​States pursuing plans to help workers save for retirement
​CHICAGO (AP) — States are moving forward with new initiatives to help workers save for retirement, even as the Republican-led Congress tries to block​​​ rules making it easier for them to do so.

Studies show a sharp divide in retirement savings between those who have employer-sponsored plans and those who do not. The state programs are designed to fill in the gap.
1/27/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Broad worries about potential health care loss
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Though "Obamacare" still divides Americans, a majority worry that many will lose coverage if the 2010 law is repealed in the nation's long-running political standoff over health care.

A new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that 56 percent of U.S. adults are "extremely" or "very" concerned that many will lose health insurance if the health overhaul is repealed. That includes more than 8 in 10 Democrats, nearly half of independents, and more than 1 in 5 Republicans. Another 45 percent of Republicans say they're "somewhat" concerned.
1/18/2017 AP-NORC Poll: Americans of all stripes say fix health care
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Sylvia Douglas twice voted for President Barack Obama and last year cast a ballot for Democrat Hillary Clinton. But when it comes to "Obamacare," she now sounds like President-elect Donald Trump. This makes her chuckle amid the serious choices she faces every month between groceries, electricity and paying a health insurance bill that has jumped by nearly $400.

"It's a universal thing, nobody likes it," Douglas, a licensed practical nurse in Huntsville, Alabama, said of Obama's signature law. "They need to fix it with whatever works, but not make more of a mess like they have now."

That Americans agree on much of anything is remarkable after a presidential race that ripped open the nation's economic, political and cultural divisions. But on the brink of the Trump presidency, a new poll finds ample accord across those divisions on the need to do something about health care in the United States.
1/17/2017 Poll: Young Americans fear they will be worse off post-Trump
​NEW YORK (AP) — As Donald Trump approaches his inauguration, young Americans have a deeply pessimistic view about his incoming administration, with young blacks, Latinos and Asian Americans particularly concerned about what's to come in the next four years.

That's according to a new GenForward poll of Americans aged 18 to 30, which found that the country's young adults are more likely to expect they'll be worse off at the end of Trump's first term than better off. Such young Americans are also far more likely to think Trump will divide the country than unite it, by a 60 percent to 19 percent margin.
1/17/2017 Poll: Young Americans doubt media's ability to cover Trump
​NEW YORK (AP) — Most young Americans are concerned about the media's ability to report on Donald Trump and his efforts to obstruct coverage of his administration, and most think it's at least somewhat likely he will make it harder for Americans to express dissent.

That's according to a new GenForward poll of Americans aged 18 to 30, nearly two-thirds of whom say they're either very (25 percent) or somewhat (38 percent) concerned about Trump trying to impede journalists as they report on his incoming administration.
1/9/2017 ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​AP-NORC Poll: Obama won nation's approval, didn't unite it
​WASHINGTON (AP) — More Americans feel Barack Obama's presidency divided the country than feel it brought people together, a new poll shows. Yet he leaves office held in high esteem by a solid majority.

Eight years after Obama's historic election, just 27 percent see the U.S. as more united as a result of his presidency, according to an Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll conducted after the 2016 election. Far more — 44 percent — say it's more divided.
12/27/2016 Growing number of Americans are retiring outside the US
​Newly widowed, Kay McCowen quit her job, sold her house, applied for Social Security and retired to Mexico. It was a move she and her husband, Mel, had discussed before he passed away in 2012.

"I wanted to find a place where I could afford to live off my Social Security," she said. "The weather here is so perfect, and it's a beautiful place."

She is among a growing number of Americans who are retiring outside the United States. The number grew 17 percent between 2010 and 2015 and is expected to increase over the next 10 years as more baby boomers retire.
12/6/2016 ​​​​​​Poll: Racial vulnerability linked to youth vote choice
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Among the youngest white adult Americans, feelings of racial and economic vulnerability appear to be closely connected to their support for Donald Trump in last month's election.

That's according to an analysis of a new GenForward poll of Americans between the ages of 18 and 30. Other surveys of white adults of all ages have found a similar pattern.​
10/24/2016 ​​​​​​​​​​​Poll: Young voters now coming through for Hillary Clinton

WASHINGTON (AP) — Liane Golightly has finally decided who she'll vote for on Election Day. Hillary Clinton is not a choice the 30-year-old Republican would have predicted, nor one that excites her. But the former supporter of Ohio Gov. John Kasich says it's the only choice she can make.

"I kind of wish it were somebody else, somebody that I could really get behind 100 percent," said Golightly, an educator from Monroe, Michigan. She's voting for Clinton, she said, only because she can't stomach "childish" Donald Trump.

Like Golightly, many young voters are coming over to Clinton in the closing stretch of the 2016 campaign, according to a new GenForward poll of Americans 18 to 30.

10/24/2016 For some low-income workers, retirement is only a dream

​CHICAGO (AP) — It was a striking image. A photo of an 89-year-old man hunched over, struggling to push his cart with frozen treats. Fidencio Sanchez works long hours every day selling the treats because he couldn't afford to retire. The photo and his story went viral and thousands of people donated more than $384,000 for his retirement.

10/14/2016 Nearly half of young adults lack retirement savings, pension
​NEW YORK (AP) — Young Americans with even just $1 saved for retirement are ahead of the pack.

Forty-eight percent of all Americans aged 18 to 30 have zero in retirement savings and no access to a traditional pension, according to a GenForward poll by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago with the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
10/9/2016 GenForward Poll: Half of black youth face job discrimination
WASHINGTON (AP) — Qymana Botts saw white colleagues with the same amount of experience getting promoted to cashier ahead of her at the Indiana discount store where she worked. When she asked her supervisors why, they told her she didn't project the image that they wanted from their cashiers: straight hair — not her natural Afro — and more makeup.
 
"When it came time for promotions and raises and things like that, I was told I need to fit into a more European kind of appearance," Botts said of her 2010 experience. "They wanted me to straighten my hair, but I wasn't willing to do that."
 
Botts, 25, is not alone.
 
Almost half of young African-Americans say they've experienced racial discrimination while looking for a job and while on the job, and one-third of young women of all races and ethnicities say they've faced employment-related gender discrimination.​
10/5/2016 Black, Latino youth less likely to get money from folks
​WASHINGTON (AP) — More young blacks and Latinos feel that they can't depend on family to help them with financial needs, from big-ticket items like college tuition to smaller expenses, than do whites or Asians, according to a new GenForward poll.
 
And more than half of millennials overall say an unexpected bill of $1,000 would cause them financial difficulty, a sign that young Americans are still struggling years after the end of the recession, according to the poll released this week.
10/3/2016 Young adults prefer Clinton on income gap, divide on jobs

​WASHINGTON (AP) — Young adults are more likely to trust Hillary Clinton than Donald Trump on handling wages, income inequality and personal finances, but they're divided on which candidate would better handle job creation, a new GenForward poll shows.

Young Hispanics, blacks and Asian-Americans favor Clinton on all four economic issues, but young whites are more likely to favor Trump on both job creation and their personal finances.

GenForward is a survey of adults age 18 to 30 by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago with the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. The first-of-its-kind poll pays special attention to the voices of young adults of color, highlighting how race and ethnicity shape the opinions of a new generation.
10/3/2016 Among young voters, Obama's popularity may not transfer
​DURHAM, North Carolina (AP) — Paulos Muruts is set to cast his first presidential ballot for Hillary Clinton — if he makes it to the ballot box.
 
"I might need someone on Election Day to actually convince me to go out and vote," says the 19-year-old Duke University student, arguing that the Democratic nominee "has the experience" and "exudes the right temperament" but "doesn't inspire excitement."

Yet mention Clinton's would-be predecessor and Muruts' eyes light up.
 
"Love President Obama," he says. "He's got swagger."
 
Muruts represents a frustrating political reality for Clinton in her matchup against Republican nominee Donald Trump: She'll fare far better on Election Day among voters age 18-30, but she could fall short of Obama's totals and turnouts that drove his national victories in 2008 and 2012, a new GenForward survey suggests.
10/1/2016 AP-NORC Poll: Half of Trump backers don't trust vote count

NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Trump is making the unprecedented assertion that the general election "is going to be rigged," and many people who are drawn to his presidential campaign have major doubts about the accuracy of the Nov. 8 vote.

Only about one-third of Republicans say they have a great deal or quite a bit of confidence that votes on Election Day will be counted fairly, according to a poll from the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

9/24/2016 AP-NORC Poll: Most in US frustrated over presidential race

WASHINGTON (AP) — Carol Jones knows what she wants to hear Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump discuss during their first televised debate: education and jobs. She's far from sure which candidate will earn her vote on Election Day.

"All we see is the cat fighting," says the Shirley, Arkansas, retired substitute teacher. At Monday's debate, the 70-year-old says, "they need to talk about their programs ... but I don't think they will."

A majority of Americans, like Jones, say they're frustrated, angry — or both — with the 2016 presidential election, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Most Americans aren't feeling proud or hopeful about the race, and half feel helpless, the results find. Majorities of Americans want more focus on issues that are important to them, starting with health care, Social Security, education, terrorism and homeland security.

9/14/2016 ​​​​​​​​​​​​Poll: Americans favor slightly higher bills to fight warming​
​WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans are willing to pay a little more each month to fight global warming — but only a tiny bit, according to a new poll. Still, environmental policy experts hail that as a hopeful sign.

Seventy-one percent want the federal government to do something about global warming, including 6 percent who think the government should act even though they are not sure that climate change is happening, according to a poll conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago.
9/8/2016 Young voters from newer immigrant families lean more liberal

WASHINGTON (AP) — Young Hispanic and Asian-Americans who are immigrants or have an immigrant parent are more likely to be liberal in their views on politics and immigration than those with families who have been in United States longer, a new GenForward poll shows.

Eighty-seven percent of those age 18 to 30 who are immigrants or who have parents who are immigrants support allowing those who were brought to the United States illegally as children to stay legally, while 72 percent of those whose families have been in the U.S. longer agree. Eighty-five percent of first and second generation Latino and Asian immigrants and 74 percent of those who are third generation or greater oppose building a border wall.

9/5/2016 Poll: Support for Black Lives Matter grows among white youth

WASHINGTON (AP) — Support for the Black Lives Matter movement has increased among young white adults, according to a poll that suggests a majority of white, black, Asian and Hispanic young adults now support the movement calling for accountability for police in the deaths of African-Americans.

Fifty-one percent of white adults between the ages of 18 and 30 say in a GenForward poll they now strongly or somewhat support Black Lives Matter, a 10-point increase since June, while 42 percent said they do not support the movement.

9/5/2016 Young whites divide on handling violence by, against police

WASHINGTON (AP) — Young people across racial and ethnic lines are more likely to say they trust Hillary Clinton than Donald Trump to handle instances of police violence against African-Americans. But young whites are more likely to say they trust Trump to handle violence committed against the police.

That's according to a new GenForward poll of young adults age 18 to 30. The poll is conducted by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago with the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. The first-of-its-kind poll pays special attention to the voices of young adults of color, highlighting how race and ethnicity shape the opinions of a new generation.

9/2/2016 Poll: Young adults divided on immigration, border control

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Young Hispanics, Asian-Americans and African-Americans are much more likely to trust Hillary Clinton than Donald Trump to deal with immigrants living in the United States illegally. But young whites tend to trust Trump more on issues related to illegal immigration, including securing the border.

Among young people overall, 47 percent say they think Trump would better handle securing the border, 26 percent say Clinton would, and 18 percent say neither would.

That's according to a new GenForward survey of adults age 18 to 30 by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago with the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. There's division on which candidate would better handle immigrants in the country now without permission, with 39 percent choosing Clinton, 38 percent Trump and 14 percent neither.

8/31/2016 Poll: Most young adults say police treat some differently

​WASHINGTON (AP) — Across racial and ethnic groups, most young Americans think police treat some groups of people differently than others, according to a new GenForward poll.

The poll shows that most think African-Americans, Latinos, the poor and immigrants are more likely to be mistreated. It also shows that young blacks are especially likely to say they've experienced arrest, harassment or violence by police.

8/31/2016 GenForward Poll: Young black adults less trusting of police

WASHINGTON (AP) — Young Americans are about equally likely to say they've had an encounter with police, but young black adults are much more likely than whites to say they've been arrested, harassed or know someone who has been, a new GenForward poll said Wednesday.

Twenty-eight percent of blacks say they have been arrested after encounters with law enforcement, 24 percent say they've been personally harassed by police, and 53 percent say they know someone who has.

8/25/2016 AP-NORC Poll: Gender matters, but does it hurt or help?
​DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — There's no "glass ceiling" keeping a woman from the presidential nomination anymore, but most Americans still think Hillary Clinton's gender will influence the November election. They're just divided on whether it's more of a curse than a blessing.

According to a new poll from the Associated-Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, most Americans see Clinton's gender playing a role in the campaign, with 37 percent saying her gender will help her chances of being elected president, 29 percent arguing it will hurt her, and 33 percent thinking it won't make a difference.
8/24/2016 ​​​​​​​​​Lo que más temen los hispanos de la vejez (What most Hispanics fear of old age)​
El deterioro de su capacidad mental y perder su independencia es lo que más les inquieta a los hispanos. También temen dejarle deudas a sus familias.

Estos son los resultados de una encuesta que este miércoles publicó la Associated Press y el Norc Center for Public Affair Research de la Universidad de Chicago, llamada “Cuidado a largo plazo en Estados Unidos: Cómo los hispanos esperan envejecer”.​
8/9/2016 Poll: Young Americans favor LGBT rights on adoption, more
WASHINGTON (AP) — Young people in America overwhelmingly support LGBT rights when it comes to policies on employment, health care and adoption, according to a new survey.

The GenForward survey of Americans ages 18-30 found that support for those policies has increased over the past two years, especially among young whites. But relatively few of these young adults consider rights for people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender to be among the top issues facing the country.​
8/8/2016 Poll: Young Americans fear US, foreign-inspired extremists
​BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — The threat of violence by people inspired by foreign extremists invokes fear in a majority of young Americans across racial groups. But for young people of color, particularly African-Americans, that fear is matched or surpassed by worries about violence from white extremists.

A new GenForward poll of Americans age 18-30 shows widespread anxiety among young people about attacks from both inside and outside the United States.
8/6/2016 Poll: Young adults support new efforts to curb gun violence
​​CHICAGO (AP) -- LaShun Roy supports a ban on semi-automatic weapons and more comprehensive background checks. But the 21-year-old gun owner from rural Texas doesn't consider gun-control measures a top priority in this year's elections.

For Keionna Cottrell, a 24-year-old who lives on Chicago's South Side and whose brother was shot and killed this year in another Illinois city, few things are more important than limiting access to guns.

 The AP-NORC Center in the Media

On this page you will find the Associated Press stories based upon research done by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Each story ran on each of the AP media platforms, which means that they appeared in newspapers, on radio and TV stations, and online across the country and throughout the world.

It is estimated that approximately one-half the world’s population receives news and information from The Associated Press each day, which suggests the reach and penetration of each of these stories.

 Media Contact

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